Language // Język

@PsychScientists Why not? Topographical maps are easy to produce. Why would evolution bother with sth else? Bitmaps… https://t.co/nqPQBJqxBs
RT @sbaroncohen: Is schizophrenia an "immune disease"? If so, does this open new treatment options? https://t.co/R7rE0VcHxz
RT @lisabortolotti: Are you interested in #confabulation? Submit a 500-word paper to this: https://t.co/o65udcaBYw Thanks to @elila74 for@h…
RT @mike_yassa: Quick peak at my grants folder. rejected on left, current funded on right. No success without failure. Like A LOT of failur…
New issue of Hybris journal on internalism and cognitive science https://t.co/b6UvvFGtrp

Information technology changes our everyday lives. We typically use computers for writing, editing, calculating, and information searching, and increasingly for reading, listening to music, viewing photos and watching movies. We carry small computers in our pockets and use them to make phone calls, write emails, get information and entertain ourselves, wherever we are. How does this massive digitisation of information, knowledge and everyday communication affect our language? Will our language change or even disappear? These are the kinds of questions that I answer in the META-NET publication: The Polish Language in The Digital Age. Freely downloadable!

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